As mentioned in our previous post, we stayed west of the Appalachian mountains to avoid heavy rain from Hurricane Florence and continued traveling south towards Lexington, KY. We stayed at a beautiful campground in the Kentucky Horse Park. The Kentucky Horse Park is a 1,224-acre facility dedicated to “man’s relationship with the horse.” It is open to the public and offers daily events such as “Horses of the World” which showcases both common and rare horses from around the globe. The horses are ridden in authentic costume and an announcer provides a colorful overview on each breed of horse shown. In addition, the park contains the International Museum of the Horse which has a permanent collection of horse history along with a rotating historical collection focused on a particular theme. This great park has miles of paved bicycle paths that wrap around its perimeter and connect to an adjacent green way that leads to the city of Lexington. We really enjoyed riding on the long bicycle trails while looking at beautiful country meadows and horse pastures.

While visiting the Kentucky Horse Park, we were invited to pat the forehead of a huge draft horse that stood almost 17 “hands” tall and learned a lot about various horse breeds. For example, we learned that a “hand” was an Old English unit of measurement equivalent to about 4 inches and is still used today to determine the height of a horse. The height is measured from the ground to the top of a horse’s “withers”. The “withers” is a ridge formed on the spine between the shoulder blades and is located below the base of the horse’s neck.

Several well known horses that won Triple Crown races are kept in comfortable retirement at the Kentucky Horse Park stables. They are walked into a ring where an announcer describes each horse along with how many legs of the Triple Crown it had won. Videos of each horse race are shown and guests are asked to come and pet each “superstar” horse if they are interested. I am sure we only scratched the surface of learning about “horse sense” but the Kentucky Horse Park is certainly worth a visit if you love horses or just want to learn more about them. Here are some interesting photos from our visit there …

 

We anxiously viewed daily news reports about the considerable damage left by Hurricane Florence while contacting friends and family to ensure they were OK. Our next destination was Columbia, SC to visit our daughter and some friends but we still had several miles of travel to go between Kentucky and South Carolina so we camped overnight at a neat little RV park called Dumplin Valley Farm in Kodak, TN. The farm is the home of the Annual Dumplin Valley Bluegrass Festival held on the 3rd weekend of September each year (we missed it by one week). This campground was unique in that it was built out of necessity to accommodate bluegrass fans and not originally designed as an RV campground. Here are a few photos of the farm that became a campground…

 

On September 21st, we arrived at Sesquicentennial State Park in Columbia, SC and camped there for a few days while visiting with our daughter, Kara, and good friends Richard & Sherrie Hill. We had lived in Columbia for several years and occasionally visited the state park but hadn’t really appreciated it or its history. Sesquicentennial Park was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930’s and is a fine example of a nice recreational park that still serves us today. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 for unemployed, unmarried men. It helped pull our country out of the Great Depression by providing badly needed jobs to those who couldn’t find work to support themselves. The CCC built many of the state parks that we still enjoy today. We hiked through this park and truly appreciated all of the hard labor that went into building it back in the 1930’s. Below are a couple of pics of this nice state park:

 

We took our family to the local Greek Festival in downtown Columbia and sampled delicious Greek food plates. The next day, we visited with our good friends, Richard & Sherrie, and asked them if we could wash some clothes at their house. We don’t have a washer or dryer in our Airstream so we aren’t shy when visiting with family or friends who do have one !!! (Word of warning to family and friends, if we are headed your way we most likely will arrive bearing wine or some kind of gift and dirty laundry!) That evening, we did go out for a really nice dinner at Rossi’s Italian Restaurant. On September 25th, we left Columbia and headed towards Lake Lanier, GA. Bonnie’s cousins, Janet and Tom, live in the area so we planned on parking our Airstream at a nearby Army Corp of Engineers campground while visiting her…